Posts tagged music business

I’ve been following the work of Gerd Leonhard for a few years. His presentation at MIDEM 2012 was particularly eye-opening, especially where he talks about the impact of mobile devices on music. If you’ve not been following him, here’s an opportunity to get up to speed. When major record labels are lobbying Government for new laws on your internet use, it’s time to pay attention.

Is Gerd Leonhard Right About The Future Of Music Business?

Nice post about my music-related work. Thanks Andy!!

It’s a safe bet that the wealthy median American consumer of the 2020s, 2030s, and 2040s will want to be entertained, and will be prepared to spend more on entertainment products and services than the median consumer in 2012, 2000, or 1980. And one way or another, a large fraction of that money will wind up in the pockets of musicians, authors, actors, and other creative professionals. Markets are unpredictable, so we can’t predict exactly how this will happen. But we should be pretty confident that it will.
(via Music industry booms in digital makeover - Hindustan Times)
Interesting take on the music biz.

(via Music industry booms in digital makeover - Hindustan Times)

Interesting take on the music biz.

Here is an interesting factoid via Hypebot (one of the few decent sites on the future of the music business:). In this context please take a look at my 2007 Open Letter to the Independent Music Industry – you’ll find some hints there, as well (alas… too little too late?). You may also enjoy my 2010 post on what I titled Unsolicited Advise for WMG 2.0 – what a truly future-focussed Warner Music Group could look like – guess that all went up in the ether somewhere. Or not? (via Poor Fan Engagement Is Costing Music Industry $450M – $2.7B Annually [Nielsen Study] via Hypebot - Futurist Gerd Leonhard)

Here is an interesting factoid via Hypebot (one of the few decent sites on the future of the music business:). In this context please take a look at my 2007 Open Letter to the Independent Music Industry – you’ll find some hints there, as well (alas… too little too late?). You may also enjoy my 2010 post on what I titled Unsolicited Advise for WMG 2.0 – what a truly future-focussed Warner Music Group could look like – guess that all went up in the ether somewhere. Or not? (via Poor Fan Engagement Is Costing Music Industry $450M – $2.7B Annually [Nielsen Study] via Hypebot - Futurist Gerd Leonhard)

(via Will Streaming Music Ever Be Profitable?)
Answer: not with the music industry killing every innovative company they can get their hands on:)

(via Will Streaming Music Ever Be Profitable?)

Answer: not with the music industry killing every innovative company they can get their hands on:)

Music is a much smaller and less significant part of many people’s lives than 10-20 years ago. There is more competition for our attention and the value of music has declined precipitously. This graphic shows the rise of digital against physical music, and the overall impact of piracy, widespread distribution and digital media on the music industry. The sad story is that overall the music business is shrinking. That is a fact that we all have to face. The silver lining in all of this may be on the horizon, but it cannot come soon enough for me. We have to do something to reverse the trend.

Gerd Leonhard video: DMT 108 Video - Internet Radio Acts, Pandora, Google’s Free matching & more (by Andrea Leonelli)

Among the bigger-name streaming services are Spotify, which uses a freemium ad-supported, desktop app-based model; Rdio, which takes a tiered, cloud-based approach; and Pandora, whose personalised streaming radio is also available on a freemium ad-supported model. There’s also Wimp, Rara, Napster, We7, Pure, Last.fm, Senzari, Grooveshark, Sony Music Unlimited, Songza, Mog, Samsung Music Hub, and Microsoft’s Xbox Music, to name a few. In total, more than 500 legal music services are operating across the world, together having registered over 13 million paying subscribers - a figure that jumped more than 65 per cent last year, according to the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry’s (IFPI) Digital Music Report 2012 ….

Too big to succeed: Is the music streaming market doomed to failure? | ITProPortal.com

It’s all about access, not ownership. And Freemium. The music business needs to get this, or fold.

Check out this quite entertaining new video of a web-conference with Andrea from Digital Music Trends, on the topic of Internet Radio Acts, Pandora, Google’s Free matching & more (by Andrea Leonelli).

The music industry insists on being paid. But by doing so in such clumsy and badly implemented ways, they have destroyed any pleasure from listening to music and alienated countless customers. I tried to buy CDs, but Apple can’t copy them properly onto my PC. My PC can’t stream them reliably through my Squeezebox because of Microsoft and Logitech. No music subscription service I can access on the Squeezebox is any good at all.
Crosby, Stills and Nash have released an iPad app developed by Contendis that allows fans to subscribe to exclusive content, updates and premium fan features. Think online fan club without access to concert tickets. The band is calling it the first subscription-based iPad app for a recording artist to be approved for sale in the Apple App Store. The app is free to download. A subscription costs $3.99 per month or $39.99 per year and can be purchased within the app.
According to StageofLife.com, in August, 49% of teens and college-age consumers reported spending zero dollars per month on music. Rather than buying iTunes singles or CDs of even their favorite artists, this age group copies music from friends, downloads free songs from music websites and streams music online. (via With Streaming and Sharing, Teens Find Ways Around Paying for Music - eMarketer)
Gerd adds: the real revenue streams will NOT come from selling copies but providing ACCESS and then upselling from there. Time to wake up.
Read these free books incl. Music 2.0: http://gerd.fm/freepdfs

According to StageofLife.com, in August, 49% of teens and college-age consumers reported spending zero dollars per month on music. Rather than buying iTunes singles or CDs of even their favorite artists, this age group copies music from friends, downloads free songs from music websites and streams music online. (via With Streaming and Sharing, Teens Find Ways Around Paying for Music - eMarketer)

Gerd adds: the real revenue streams will NOT come from selling copies but providing ACCESS and then upselling from there. Time to wake up.

Read these free books incl. Music 2.0: http://gerd.fm/freepdfs

Whereas Pandora, and many of its competitors, use a compulsory license to stream music to users, Apple is looking to forge direct deals with labels for more comprehensive and flexible licensing. In other words, Apple radio probably won’t ever tell you that you can’t skip a song. And unlike Pandora, if you want to listen to all Johnny Cash, all the time, Apple won’t fold in music that’s similar to Johnny Cash just to follow licensing requirements. In essence, it is expected to be the best internet radio ever. If real, of course.

Watch Out, Pandora: Apple’s Streaming Radio Service Could Launch In Early 2013 | TechCrunch

Gerd comments: Apple knows that very soon, listening IS THE SAME as downloading - there is no real difference between radio and ‘buying a song’, very soon. Stay tuned.