Posts tagged tv

Kevin Lockett, Digital Media Analyst from Lockett Media, says the result will be a fundamentally changed cable industry - one that will have to be far more transparent and flexible in order to keep its customers from defecting to new Internet-based options. If and when the general public figures out that it now has real alternatives, Locket says, “the cable companies are in trouble.”

The End of Cable TV? How Everyone Will Watch Television In The Future – ReadWrite

How much attention is OTT getting? The Interpret LLC’s New Media Measure syndicated report sets the number of US consumers age 18-65 that own an Internet-enabled set top box (like a Roku player, Apple TV, Slingbox, Vudu box, etc.) at 13.6%, reported a company spokesperson. Less than 14% may not sound like much, but OTT has been around for only three years. And Interpret’s numbers don’t include the millions of users watching alternate video sources like YouTube and Vimeo.

(via 2012 KPCB Internet Trends Year-End Update)

Another must-read 5* slide deck from Mary Meeker @KPCB

The exciting news for advertisers? One of the most frequently handled devices in the house, previously incapable of carrying ads, will become a channel for the most personalized kinds of messages. Just imagine the ads you can send to a remote control that knows not just what its owner is watching, but what he or she likes to watch in general.

New BBC chief vows to re-invent content, not just re-purpose it — paidContent

We need to be ready to produce and create genuinely digital content for the first time. And we need to understand better what it will mean to assemble, edit and present such content in a digital setting where social recommendation and other forms of curation will play a much more influential role.

(via MediaFuturist: PDFs and resources from today’s webinar on The Future of Television (with Stowe Boyd))
In case you missed our webinar on SocialTV and the Future of Television, today (shame on you;): the video will go live in a few hours (assuming the recording actually worked) on my Youtube Webinars playlist.And here are the slides we used (creative commons non-commercial, attribution licensed, as usual):  Gerd, Stowe   as well as the reports we referenced (subject to different licenses):  Ericsson: Getting Social on TV  Google: The new multi-screen world, and Stowe’s Social TV report.

(via MediaFuturist: PDFs and resources from today’s webinar on The Future of Television (with Stowe Boyd))

In case you missed our webinar on SocialTV and the Future of Television, today (shame on you;): the video will go live in a few hours (assuming the recording actually worked) on my Youtube Webinars playlist.

And here are the slides we used (creative commons non-commercial, attribution licensed, as usual):  Gerd, Stowe   as well as the reports we referenced (subject to different licenses):  Ericsson: Getting Social on TV  Google: The new multi-screen world, and Stowe’s Social TV report.

(via The Future Of TV Is Two Screens, One Held Firmly In Your Hands | Fast Company)
52% of all adult cell phone owners now “incorporate their mobile devices into their television watching experiences.”
Here’s more:
6% of these “connected viewers” had voted for a reality show result in the preceding 30 days
11% checked what people were saying online about a program they were viewing
11% commented online about a program they were watching
22% checked to see if something they’d seen on TV was true
23% texted someone they knew was watching the same TV content elsewhere

(via The Future Of TV Is Two Screens, One Held Firmly In Your Hands | Fast Company)

52% of all adult cell phone owners now “incorporate their mobile devices into their television watching experiences.”

Here’s more:

  • 6% of these “connected viewers” had voted for a reality show result in the preceding 30 days
  • 11% checked what people were saying online about a program they were viewing
  • 11% commented online about a program they were watching
  • 22% checked to see if something they’d seen on TV was true
  • 23% texted someone they knew was watching the same TV content elsewhere
TV news is ultimately much more an arm of the entertainment industry than it is of the news industry. Its star anchors get paid millions of dollars because they’re popular on TV, not because of their reporting skills; and while the occasional news magazine program will sometimes break news, newspapers and websites have always been the undisputed leaders on that front.

- Felix Salmon: “News Corp’s digital divergence (via reuters)

joshsternberg

If you haven’t, I suggest reading Postman’s “Amusing Ourselves To Death” (from 1985) which discusses this idea that TV news is actually entertainment.

(via stoweboyd)