Posts tagged television

The plague of sanitized media coverage reaches far beyond Turkey. Across the globe, and especially in young or struggling democracies like Argentina, Venezuela, Brazil, the Philippines, South Africa, Hungary and Albania, the lack of media independence is doing real damage. Media executives who intimidate or censor reporters while kowtowing to governments to protect their other business interests are undermining the freedom and independence of the press that is vital to establishing and consolidating a democratic political culture. (via In Turkey, Media Bosses Are Undermining Democracy - NYTimes.com)
Made me think.

The plague of sanitized media coverage reaches far beyond Turkey. Across the globe, and especially in young or struggling democracies like Argentina, Venezuela, Brazil, the Philippines, South Africa, Hungary and Albania, the lack of media independence is doing real damage. Media executives who intimidate or censor reporters while kowtowing to governments to protect their other business interests are undermining the freedom and independence of the press that is vital to establishing and consolidating a democratic political culture. (via In Turkey, Media Bosses Are Undermining Democracy - NYTimes.com)

Made me think.

(via • Chart: TV Remains Number 1 News Source for Americans | Statista)
Gerd adds: give it another 2 years - the cord-nevers are coming!

(via • Chart: TV Remains Number 1 News Source for Americans | Statista)

Gerd adds: give it another 2 years - the cord-nevers are coming!

Aereo kicked off CES with news that it’s expanding its access to live and recorded TV for as low as $8 a month nationwide. After starting off in the New York region over the course of the last year, it plans to launch in 22 markets, becoming accessible to 97 million consumers by the end of 2013. The company can offer television access inexpensively because it’s based on a controversial technology: it owns a minuscule antenna for each customer, enabling it to broadcast TV without paying re-transmission fees to media companies. (Litigation from media companies is ongoing). CEO Chet Kanoja is entirely upfront about the fact that he is going after the young “cord never” demographic. He says half of Aereo’s subscribers have never paid for cable. “You know anyone under the age of 30 isn’t going to go out and get a cable subscription,” Kanoja said. “So they represent a massive audience and the opportunity to create a completely new ecosystem.”
The internet and television are converging. There’s no cable box involved in TWC’s Roku app, which may be the most radical thing about it. It’s TV, but the signal is delivered over the internet. TWC can do this because—like Cablevision, AT&T, Verizon, and others—it’s both a cable television provider (an MVPD in industry jargon) and internet service provider (ISP)….
t wants to start by offering what Erik Huggers, vp of media, called “a better bundle.” Instead of making subscribers pay for dozens, even hundreds, of channels they don’t want just to get the few they do, Intel wants to offer niche bundles. Like, say, a sports-only bundle that would offer the myriad variations of ESPN or a lifestyle bundle with HGTV, The Cooking Channel and similar networks. It isn’t the à la carte format we’ve all been hoping for, but it is a big step in that direction. Intel took some flack for not promising cheaper cable bills or à la carte with its yet-to-be-named service. The reality is that if Intel had walked into NBC Universal or Disney and asked for à la carte channel subscriptions, there’s a good chance they would have never got past the wall of laughter from network executives. Networks bundle their offerings to pay-TV providers in order to recoup the costs of creating redundant shows (how many ESPNs do we really need?). That cost and those channels are passed on to viewers. If you’re a Comcast customer and you want Nickelodeon, you must pay for all of the Nickelodeon channels.

Intel Could Lead Push to A La Carte Pay TV | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

Some very good points here; I look forward to trying what Eric Hugger will cook up;)

Room-Sized Video Conferencing Today’s Skype and FaceTime experience is optimized for 1:1 communications, not room-size communications. Intel is optimizing their set top box experience so an entire family could sit on the couch and interact with their friends and family remotely. A wide angle lens and high quality mics are included to facilitate the 10′ experience. Today, my family crowds around on PC and tries to do the same thing, but ultimately, the crowd disperses and it falls back to 1:1 video conferencing. In FaceTime, the phone is transferred from person to person during holiday events.

The End of Cable TV? How Everyone Will Watch Television In The Future – ReadWrite

How much attention is OTT getting? The Interpret LLC’s New Media Measure syndicated report sets the number of US consumers age 18-65 that own an Internet-enabled set top box (like a Roku player, Apple TV, Slingbox, Vudu box, etc.) at 13.6%, reported a company spokesperson. Less than 14% may not sound like much, but OTT has been around for only three years. And Interpret’s numbers don’t include the millions of users watching alternate video sources like YouTube and Vimeo.

Make no mistake: Intel is proposing something genuinely audacious here. It’s live multichannel programming delivered over a broadband data pipe, but sold separately. It might be delivered over coaxial cable if that’s where you get your broadband, but that’s an accident. It could just as easily be over fiberoptic or wireless. You could switch providers and keep your TV service exactly the same; you could move across the country and keep your TV service exactly the same.

MIPTV 2010 | Gerd Leonhard: Social Media & Entertainment Brands (by mipmarkets)

One of my best talks on the Future of TV:))

With 'House Of Cards,' Netflix Begins The Future Of TV (huffpo)

After crunching the numbers, the Atlantic Wire’s Rebecca Greenfield notes that Netflix will need an additional 520,000 subscribers to cover the $100 millon cost of the project — not a significant increase, percentage-wise, to its existing 33 million userbase. Netflix’s plan is to roll out at least five new shows a year, meaning they’ll realistically need a 10 percent increase in users to cover costs.

The chip giant has already found, like so many others — Apple (AAPL), Google (GOOG), Amazon (AMZN), and Netflix (NFLX), to name a few — that getting media companies to agree to changes in business as usual is difficult at best, and often impossible. But the business landscape is quickly changing, and the ability for content studios to get their own way is getting tougher.
Talk of cord-cutting—ditching paid television subscriptions in favor of a combination of free and cheaper streaming options—has been on the rise in recent quarters, as providers like Netflix and Amazon.com gain more partnerships to stream movies and television shows. During the third quarter of 2012, providers lost an estimated 127,000 subscribers, according to reports from research firm Sanford C. Bernstein, after losing 400,000 in the second quarter.
Broadband will kill the broadcasting system as we know it. From the perspective of broadcasting the “threat” of over-the-top is very real. Broadband operates under very different rules than broadcasting yet increasingly the high value content delivered is becoming the same. And, broadband already has the capacity to deliver a whole lot more. When everything is over-the-top (OTT) the concept ceases to have any meaning.
Sling technology enables users to stream live TV from their DVRs to PCs and other connected devices. With Sling now integrated into advanced set-top boxes , and with applications available for devices like the iPhone, iPad and Android mobile devices , Dish subscribers now have the ability to stream their programming anywhere….
To understand why the Internet hasn’t destroyed cable, ask yourself: Where do you get your Internet? It’s probably from the same people selling you TV. Since 2005, total cable industry revenue is up 50% — and two-thirds of that increase came from selling something that wasn’t television. For the most part, it was Internet. Cable companies like Comcast and Time Warner Cable sell broadband at ridiculously high margins. When you compare the total cost and profit of selling TV versus selling Internet, it’s clear to Moffett that pay TV “has represented less than half of [cable’s] business for more than a year.” (via How the TV Business Got Rich Off the Thing That Was Going to the Kill It: The Internet - Derek Thompson - The Atlantic)

To understand why the Internet hasn’t destroyed cable, ask yourself: Where do you get your Internet? It’s probably from the same people selling you TV. Since 2005, total cable industry revenue is up 50% — and two-thirds of that increase came from selling something that wasn’t television. For the most part, it was Internet. Cable companies like Comcast and Time Warner Cable sell broadband at ridiculously high margins. When you compare the total cost and profit of selling TV versus selling Internet, it’s clear to Moffett that pay TV “has represented less than half of [cable’s] business for more than a year.” (via How the TV Business Got Rich Off the Thing That Was Going to the Kill It: The Internet - Derek Thompson - The Atlantic)