Posts tagged publishing

meetingofthemindsv:

Future of Media, Print, Publishing: Meeting of the Minds #6 Futurists Gerd Leonhard & Ross Dawson (by Gerd Leonhard)

meetingofthemindsv:

Future of Media, Print, Publishing: Meeting of the Minds #6 Futurists Gerd Leonhard & Ross Dawson (by Gerd Leonhard)

Abril is not alone. In June the Folha de São Paulo, the country’s largest daily, sacked 24 staff, 6% of the total. Its rival, O Estado de São Paulo, has been hit, too. After the death in May of its director, Ruy Mesquita, the paper cut 50 jobs. Its sister paper, the Jornal da Tarde, which stood up to the military dictatorship that ran from 1964-85, folded last year. The crisis is reckoned to have claimed 280 jobs in São Paulo alone this year. “We’re in the middle of a storm,” says Jayme Sirotsky, a former president of the World Association of Newspapers. “Everyone is trying to produce quality news content and still stay profitable in a hostile environment.”

Publishing in Brazil: Folding papers | The Economist

ADDED VALUES are the key to the future.

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While traditional media continue their difficult decline, a cadre of the most innovative reporters, from Afghanistan to the Amazon, are quietly transforming journalism by harnessing the power of open data. Working in collaboration with civil society groups and governments, they are applying new digital tools to increasingly available data troves to tell stories via powerful interactive graphics. As a result, they are increasing transparency and empowering communities. (via How the Global Open Data Movement is Transforming Journalism | Innovation Insights | Wired.com)

While traditional media continue their difficult decline, a cadre of the most innovative reporters, from Afghanistan to the Amazon, are quietly transforming journalism by harnessing the power of open data. Working in collaboration with civil society groups and governments, they are applying new digital tools to increasingly available data troves to tell stories via powerful interactive graphics. As a result, they are increasing transparency and empowering communities. (via How the Global Open Data Movement is Transforming Journalism | Innovation Insights | Wired.com)

The rapid switch from print to digital in the United States is not being replicated exactly in European countries. Germany is showing the strongest allegiance to traditional viewing and reading habits and has the lowest levels of internet news use.

Free, Open-Source Digital Textbook Provider, Boundless, Releases Its Content Under Creative Commons | TechCrunch

It’s easy to see why open education resources and the startups taking advantage of them are frightening the [bleep] out of traditional textbook publishers. Boundless textbooks are completely free and don’t come with the expiration dates one finds on textbook rental platforms and doesn’t require students to deal with bookstore buybacks.

Youtube’s evolution from cute cat videos to Gangnam Style | SmartPlanet

In previous year-end lists, amateur viral videos at least shared the spotlight with videos that were professionally produced. This year, however, only one video, a father calling out his daughter for a Facebook post, went ultra-viral (at least enough to make the top 10). In addition to the Facebook father video, the top 10 saw four music videos (including “Gangnam Style” and “Call Me Maybe”), two comedy sketches, one commercial, one amazing feat, and one caused-based. video.

Like many publications, The New York Times has a banner ad problem. The problem is this: the Web is littered with banners and new computer-driven methods of buying discrete audiences is putting even further pressure on the display ad market. But unlike newfangled publications like BuzzFeed, the NYT isn’t giving up on the banner. In fact, it wants to reinvent it by giving it a heavy dose of the same tech savvy behind its recent pathbreaking interactive feature, “Snow Fall.” (via The New York Times’ Plan to Save the Banner Ad | Digiday)

Like many publications, The New York Times has a banner ad problem. The problem is this: the Web is littered with banners and new computer-driven methods of buying discrete audiences is putting even further pressure on the display ad market. But unlike newfangled publications like BuzzFeed, the NYT isn’t giving up on the banner. In fact, it wants to reinvent it by giving it a heavy dose of the same tech savvy behind its recent pathbreaking interactive feature, “Snow Fall.” (via The New York Times’ Plan to Save the Banner Ad | Digiday)

Irish newspapers and the battle to control online content

on closer examination, the position of the Irish dead tree media (soon to be dead for good if they continue on that path) is just the tip of the iceberg for an industry facing issues that go well beyond its reluctance to embrace the culture of web links.

Online Publishers Association: more 2012 nuggets

While banner ads are losing their luster, native ads became the trendy idea for 2012. Well, really a retread of an old idea: advertorials. In this new twist, native advertising runs in the editorial stream as branded content or sponsored packages. Native ads include any approach that integrates fully into the design or content of the website or app…
Gerd adds: advertising is becoming …. Content ;) like I said.

2012 was a big year for publishers in navigating the rapidly shifting sands of digital media. Monetizing content became less about the promise of pay walls and more about the concrete success of them. And mobile delivery – of both content and advertising – became an ingrained part of most publishing strategies, with some big wins and a lot of expectations. The year also brought two big boosts to traffic and ad revenues: the presidential election and the Summer Olympic Games. In 2013, big data is going to give publishers an edge, once they get a handle on all the metrics. While new viewability standards bring new hoops to jump through, they also provide more accountability to advertisers. It was another year of of big change and challenges, but change for good and challenges met. Here’s to another exciting, promising year in publishing in 2013!

Youtube’s evolution from cute cat videos to Gangnam Style | SmartPlanet

In previous year-end lists, amateur viral videos at least shared the spotlight with videos that were professionally produced. This year, however, only one video, a father calling out his daughter for a Facebook post, went ultra-viral (at least enough to make the top 10). In addition to the Facebook father video, the top 10 saw four music videos (including “Gangnam Style” and “Call Me Maybe”), two comedy sketches, one commercial, one amazing feat, and one caused-based. video.

2013: A year when the future of the media may lie in the palm of your hand | Media | The Guardian

The cold truth for the moment is that there is not yet an advertiser-funded model to support any digital media enterprise of significance; digital revenues at newspapers do generate double digits of millions, but are way off the triple digits that would be required for anybody to start paying for their newsrooms and developers. Nor, really are paywalls”

Gerd adds: good point - but of course the problem is that in a truly connected world nobody really needs advertising as we knew it - it must be totally reinvented to fit the “Solomo” world. IMHO ;)

Future of Media TV Broadcasting Gerd Leonhard Futurist Speaker.055 on Flickr.Curation will beat noise - the future of media, journalism :)

Future of Media TV Broadcasting Gerd Leonhard Futurist Speaker.055 on Flickr.

Curation will beat noise - the future of media, journalism :)

Newspapers versus Google: Taxing times | The Economist

Google can hardly be blamed for the recession, declining readership, and slumping advertising revenue. Online advertising has not offset the decline of print ads in newspapers. In 2011 newspaper advertising globally amounted to $76 billion, down 41% since 2007, according to the World Association of Newspapers. Only 2.2% of newspapers’ advertising revenues last year came from digital platforms, and even these are vulnerable to ad-blocking software