Posts tagged gerd

A Futurist Looks at the Future of Marketing - Dana Rousmaniere - Our Editors - Harvard Business Review

By 2020, most interruptive marketing will be gone. Instead, marketing will be personalized, customized, and adapted to what I have expressed as my wishes or opt-ins — which essentially means that advertising becomes content. Data will be essential, and as users, we’ll be paying with our data — bartering a bit of our personal information in return for the use of platforms and services

Os aplicativos de mensagem ameaçam as operadoras? Faço muitos trabalhos com as empresas de telecomunicação e elas estão realmente preocupadas com isso. Hoje elas faturam cerca de US$ 330 milhões por dia no mundo com a cobrança de SMS. E, à medida que as pessoas começam a usar smartphones, trocam o sistema normal por aplicativos. Para as operadoras é uma faca de dois gumes, porque elas têm de fornecer uma boa conexão, mas isso prejudica o SMS.

‘Em 5 anos, o volume de SMS cairá pela metade’ - Link Estadão – Cultura Digital - Estadao.com.br

Nice piece with an interview I did in Brazil, on the future of telecom.

The Future of You - Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic on the importance of curation and finding things

The most important form of knowledge today is knowing where to find stuff. In fact, the ability to find stuff is now almost as important as the ability to create stuff. Hyperconnectors are the creative of the digital era because in the age of information overload, where everybody creates online content, effectively curating content is what really matters

The Future of You - Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic on the importance of curation and finding things

The most important form of knowledge today is knowing where to find stuff. In fact, the ability to find stuff is now almost as important as the ability to create stuff. Hyperconnectors are the creative of the digital era because in the age of information overload, where everybody creates online content, effectively curating content is what really matters

Skift Report: 13 Global Trends That Will Define Travel in 2013 by Skift

We believe these 13 trends, by no means exhaustive, will help define travel and many other interconnected sectors:

Everyone wants a Chinese tourist
Ancillary fees are the new normal
Last-minute mobile hotel booking
The rise of price transparency
Travelers are hungry for food tourism
Airports as destinations
Destination branding through movies
Digital maps are one of travel’s key battlegrounds
Personal in-flight entertainment through mobile devices
Affordable design at hotels
Blurring of business and leisure travel
Cementing of the Gulf as the next great global aviation hub
Lure of the last unknown: The rise of Myanmar

Gerd adds: nice report ( and free;)

Online Publishers Association: more 2012 nuggets

While banner ads are losing their luster, native ads became the trendy idea for 2012. Well, really a retread of an old idea: advertorials. In this new twist, native advertising runs in the editorial stream as branded content or sponsored packages. Native ads include any approach that integrates fully into the design or content of the website or app…
Gerd adds: advertising is becoming …. Content ;) like I said.

2013: A year when the future of the media may lie in the palm of your hand | Media | The Guardian

The cold truth for the moment is that there is not yet an advertiser-funded model to support any digital media enterprise of significance; digital revenues at newspapers do generate double digits of millions, but are way off the triple digits that would be required for anybody to start paying for their newsrooms and developers. Nor, really are paywalls”

Gerd adds: good point - but of course the problem is that in a truly connected world nobody really needs advertising as we knew it - it must be totally reinvented to fit the “Solomo” world. IMHO ;)

Mobile Futures: rebooting everything

It’s not only newspapers and magazines that are wrestling with this – though, of course, the announcement by Newsweek that it’s going digital-only next year shows that they’re in the frontline. (“Is Heaven real? Newsweek intends to find out”, as one ironist put it on Twitter.)
Add superfast 4G connections – which we’ll have in the UK from next year – and you may wonder if the only safe business is dry-cleaning (though even that is prey to people buying cheap replacement clothes made in China).

big data snippets

A Wall Street Journal analysis estimates that the typical American doing everyday activities ends up having data being collected about him or her in 20 different ways (i.e. cell phone location, web searches and online purchases) — and more than half of the tools being used in this surveillance did not exist 15 years ago.

New slideshow by Futurist Speaker Gerd Leonhard: the Future of The Internet: Big Data, SoLoMo, Privacy, Human Machines?



This is the edited PDF of my presentation at the Online Information Conference 2012 see http://www.online-information.co.uk/static/programme-overview Everybody is talking about ‘data is the new oil’ aka big-data. SoLoMo (social local mobile) is the battle cry of the day. Human-machine interfaces are rapidly evolving and may quickly become commonplace (think Google Glasses, MSFT Kinect), artificial intelligence is the geek-phrase-of-the-day, and Kurzweil says the singularity is near/here. So how will our world really change in the next 5 years, i.e. the way we communicate, get information, create, buy and sell, travel, live and learn? What are the biggest threats and the hottest opportunities - not just in financial terms, but also in societal and human terms? Futurist Gerd Leonhard will share his foresights and explore the key ‘networked society’ scenarios.

Why Google, Not Facebook, Knows Your Darkest Secrets

"Google is no longer organizing the world’s public information; that’s doing an increasingly fine job of organizing itself. Google is keeping the world’s secrets"

Good piece — made me think
Is this a Faustian bargain ??

Why It's Important To Integrate Honesty Into Your Brand | Co.Exist

The biggest misconception is that brand perfection is necessary before honesty is a valid brand strategy. Yet ask any couple that’s been married for 30 years and they’ll tell you this: being honest does not mean being perfect. In brand parlance, it simply means truthfully communicating the challenges being faced, and then putting in the legwork to address those challenges.

A few brands can be applauded for their approach to honesty, while some have considerable work to do. This month, Ben & Jerry’s ice cream (a company owned by Unilever) successfully joined the socially responsible B Corporation movement, and in doing so has made its full B Impact Assessment and governing documents visible to the public. In the retail world, footwear company Timberland is mapping its progress in improving factory conditions. It’s a great example of a brand that’s not perfect, but working to make changes.

Brazil Goes Social: The Rise of the Brazilian Digital Middle Class

Popular chocolate brand Lacta, for example, partnered with Orkut on Fazendinha, Brazil’s answer to Facebook’s Farmville game (the name literally translates as “little farm”). When players plant a cacao seed on their virtual farm, the seed grows into a tree that produces MiniBis, Lacta’s new chocolate snack.

Barry Schwartz: The paradox of choice | Video on TED.com

Psychologist Barry Schwartz takes aim at a central tenet of western societies: freedom of choice. In Schwartz’s estimation, choice has made us not freer but more paralyzed, not happier but more dissatisfied.

Fight Growing Over Online Royalties - NYTimes.com

Sirius, for example, pays 8 percent of its revenue to record companies and artists. Pandora pays a fraction of a cent each time a song is streamed, which last year amounted to about 54 percent of its revenue, or $149 million.
“The rate being too high dramatically depresses how much music gets played,” Mr. Westergren said in a recent interview. “It has really suffocated the industry.”

Gerd adds: the music industry loves to choke their golden geese. Pandora should pay a percentage of revenues just like any other radio service, IMHO.