Posts tagged data oil

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism: Meet me at this event in London: Big Data, Big Ideas for Media, June 7, 2013

Gerd Leonhard  “Data is the new oil” says Gerd Leonhard, CEO of the Futures Agency and according to the Wall Street Journal ‘one of the leading media-futurists in the world’. With the Social Media-led explosion of available sources of information crucial to commercial decision-making, Gerd will set the scene by highlighting key trends for the next five years, and share foresights and scenarios impacting the media business and journalism in the near term.

We are entering an era of information tsunamis: mind-boggling global data torrents , all-pervasive social-local-mobile (SoLoMo) connectivity, widespread ‘wikilikean’ transparency expectations (both B2C as well as B2B), rapid changes in interface technologies (AR, gestures, voice-control, nano-technologies, bionics, AI etc), the hyper-realtime speed of information and media, and of abundant consumer choice in pretty much every sector of commerce and business.

Data is the new Oil: 3 illustrations - which one do you think is best? The theme was coined by Clive Humby at AMA 2006, but I use it a lot in my talks and presentations, see the links here

The b/w piece was done by Sedat Oezgen, the green & cloud piece is by Gerry Alpern, and the people/cloud background was licensed from sevensheaven

Think about it for a minute: Google knows our deepest secrets because we search with INTENTION - and in realtime, and often even in real-place (i.e. when using mobile devices) - for the things that matter to us - whether it is an upcoming trip or a disease that we are suffering from, or vexing problem we may have. Google knows all that stuff, and keeps it in their records (unless we take steps to delete it all… allegedly). Facebook, on the other hand, just knows what we SAY, what we share, what we purport to LIKE. That’s also quite deep but… there is a big difference. Your thoughs? Browse my Privacy to Publicy links to read more (via MediaFuturist: Facebook knows what we SAY but Google knows what we THINK - where does this leave us?)

Think about it for a minute: Google knows our deepest secrets because we search with INTENTION - and in realtime, and often even in real-place (i.e. when using mobile devices) - for the things that matter to us - whether it is an upcoming trip or a disease that we are suffering from, or vexing problem we may have. Google knows all that stuff, and keeps it in their records (unless we take steps to delete it all… allegedly). Facebook, on the other hand, just knows what we SAY, what we share, what we purport to LIKE. That’s also quite deep but… there is a big difference. Your thoughs? Browse my Privacy to Publicy links to read more (via MediaFuturist: Facebook knows what we SAY but Google knows what we THINK - where does this leave us?)

This is the slideshow from yesterday’s SwissNex event in San Francisco. Hopefully we will have a video available, soon, as well (check my Youtube Channel)
smarterplanet:

Business Schools Plan Leap Into Data - WSJ.com
Faced with an increasing stream of data from the Web and other electronic sources, many companies are seeking managers who can make sense of the numbers through the growing practice of data analytics, also known as business intelligence. Finding qualified candidates has proven difficult, but business schools hope to fill the talent gap.
This fall several schools, including Fordham University’s Graduate School of Business and Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business, are unveiling analytics electives, certificates and degree programs; other courses and programs were launched in the previous school year.
International Business Machines Corp., which has invested more than $14 billion buying analytics industry companies such as Coremetrics and Netezza Corp. since 2005, has teamed up with more than 200 schools, including Fordham, to develop analytics curriculum and training.
“The more students that graduate knowledgeable in areas we care about, the better it is not just for our company but the companies we work with,” said Steve Mills, IBM senior vice president and group executive of software and systems. “It really comes down to what clients and customers need most.”
Data analytics was once considered the purview of math, science and information-technology specialists. Now barraged with data from the Web and other sources, companies want employees who can both sift through the information and help solve business problems or strategize. For example, luxury fashion company Elie Tahari Ltd. uses analytics to examine historical buying patterns and predict future clothing purchases. Northeastern pizza chain Papa Gino’s Inc. uses analytics to examine the use of its loyalty program and has succeeded in boosting the average customer’s online order size.

smarterplanet:

Business Schools Plan Leap Into Data - WSJ.com

Faced with an increasing stream of data from the Web and other electronic sources, many companies are seeking managers who can make sense of the numbers through the growing practice of data analytics, also known as business intelligence. Finding qualified candidates has proven difficult, but business schools hope to fill the talent gap.

This fall several schools, including Fordham University’s Graduate School of Business and Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business, are unveiling analytics electives, certificates and degree programs; other courses and programs were launched in the previous school year.

International Business Machines Corp., which has invested more than $14 billion buying analytics industry companies such as Coremetrics and Netezza Corp. since 2005, has teamed up with more than 200 schools, including Fordham, to develop analytics curriculum and training.

“The more students that graduate knowledgeable in areas we care about, the better it is not just for our company but the companies we work with,” said Steve Mills, IBM senior vice president and group executive of software and systems. “It really comes down to what clients and customers need most.”

Data analytics was once considered the purview of math, science and information-technology specialists. Now barraged with data from the Web and other sources, companies want employees who can both sift through the information and help solve business problems or strategize. For example, luxury fashion company Elie Tahari Ltd. uses analytics to examine historical buying patterns and predict future clothing purchases. Northeastern pizza chain Papa Gino’s Inc. uses analytics to examine the use of its loyalty program and has succeeded in boosting the average customer’s online order size.