Posts tagged data

The web giants pumping us for information | Technology | The Observer

Given that the oil business is one of the biggest industries in the history of the world, for example, the metaphor hints at untold future riches. But it conveniently skates over the fact that oil wealth overwhelmingly benefits either ruling elites in corrupt and/or authoritarian countries, or huge corporations in democratic states.

(via • Chart: Free Apps Do Have a Price: Your User Data | Statista)  
Bottom line: if you don’t pay YOU are the content!

(via • Chart: Free Apps Do Have a Price: Your User Data | Statista)  

Bottom line: if you don’t pay YOU are the content!

Managing information overload is not the issue for L&D professionals, but fixing the filtering tools to be able to manage information more effectively is. Futurist Gerd Leonhard painted a picture of a future of hyperconnected individuals, vast, vast amounts of data and technology that had to become more human in the way his keynote at the Learning Technologies Conference 2013. (via Information overload? Fix the filters, says futurist Gerd Leonhard)

Managing information overload is not the issue for L&D professionals, but fixing the filtering tools to be able to manage information more effectively is. Futurist Gerd Leonhard painted a picture of a future of hyperconnected individuals, vast, vast amounts of data and technology that had to become more human in the way his keynote at the Learning Technologies Conference 2013. (via Information overload? Fix the filters, says futurist Gerd Leonhard)

MIT Whiz Sets Out to Humanize the Internet of Things | Wired.com

Millions of years of biological development have given humans the ability to process information using all of our senses, but the last 30 years of technology advances have focused everything through our eyes and fingertips.

Mapping the Future with Big Data | WFS

It is, in many ways, a snapshot of the way that statistical data from databases, user data from multiple participants, and social network data from the public will change the nature of rapid decision making in the years ahead. It’s a very big change, and Esri is at the forefront of the way big data and geography will merge in the future.

While traditional media continue their difficult decline, a cadre of the most innovative reporters, from Afghanistan to the Amazon, are quietly transforming journalism by harnessing the power of open data. Working in collaboration with civil society groups and governments, they are applying new digital tools to increasingly available data troves to tell stories via powerful interactive graphics. As a result, they are increasing transparency and empowering communities. (via How the Global Open Data Movement is Transforming Journalism | Innovation Insights | Wired.com)

While traditional media continue their difficult decline, a cadre of the most innovative reporters, from Afghanistan to the Amazon, are quietly transforming journalism by harnessing the power of open data. Working in collaboration with civil society groups and governments, they are applying new digital tools to increasingly available data troves to tell stories via powerful interactive graphics. As a result, they are increasing transparency and empowering communities. (via How the Global Open Data Movement is Transforming Journalism | Innovation Insights | Wired.com)

Marketing: Less guff, more puff | The Economist 4*read

Brands want deeper and more profitable relationships with consumers in exchange for the trust they hope to inspire. Marketers are stretching their notions of what brands stand for and smudging the distinction between advertising and entertainment. The lines between marketing and other disciplines within a firm are fading. Brands want to be antidotes to cynicism. But this will not divert marketers from their main task, pungently summed up by an ad exec: “to figure out and fuel consumer desires like they’ve never been fuelled before.”

How Big Data Can Make Us Happier and Healthier (good piece)

According to Reeves and Soule, Beeminder is the only platform that combines the advantages of quantified self-tracking with a commitment contract, a compelling and self-binding form of digital declaration in which users risk a public pledge as a form of accountability for their goals.

*** Must read

Big Data's Value Lies in Self-Regulation (good read)

In the future, you won’t understand that products are collecting data about you — it will be invisible.” He cites Zipcar as a company to watch — it has recently improved mobile capabilities for users. He envisions a scenario where a future Zipcar app will only recommend nearby cars that match your preferences, rather than simply a list of vehicles in your zip code.

Daniel Burrus: Big Data Is Already Producing Big Results

Let’s take one of the largest retailers—Walmart. Start by visualizing one five-drawer filing cabinet. Now, think of a room filled with 60 million five-drawer file cabinets. That’s how much data comes from all of the Walmart stores every hour. And as retailers install more sensors to add advanced predictive analytics to real-time sales and customer behavior, that figure of 60 million filing cabinets worth of data every hour is going to increase. For example, retailers are beginning to use mannequins with cameras in their eyes so they can see who’s looking at them and whether they’re male or female, pregnant or not, thin or heavy, etc. And that’s just one little data point.

A Futurist Looks at the Future of Marketing - Dana Rousmaniere - Our Editors - Harvard Business Review

By 2020, most interruptive marketing will be gone. Instead, marketing will be personalized, customized, and adapted to what I have expressed as my wishes or opt-ins — which essentially means that advertising becomes content. Data will be essential, and as users, we’ll be paying with our data — bartering a bit of our personal information in return for the use of platforms and services

The Data Made Me Do It - nice MIT piece

There is so much more data out there that you can afford to tailor it to the individual,” says Patrick Wolfe, a statistician who studies social networks at University College, London. “Statistically, strength comes from pooling people together, but then the icing on the cake is when you individualize the findings.”

In the industrial era, labor unrest came when the workers felt that the owners were profitting wrongfully from them. I wonder if in the connected age, we are going to see labor unrest when folks are unceremoniously dropped from the on-demand labor pool.

What are the labor laws in a world where workforce is on demand? And an even bigger question is how are we as a society going to create rules, when data, feedback and, most importantly, reputation are part an always-shifting equation?

With Big Data, we are creating artificial intelligences that no human can understand (made me think)

Big data will require a new group of people to take on this role. Perhaps they will be called “algorithmists.” They could take two forms—independent entities to monitor firms from outside, and employees or departments to monitor them from within—just as companies have in-house accountants as well as outside auditors who review their finances.

Data-Driven Main Street: Data will take personal service to new heights, giving small merchants the ability to provide goods and services tailored to the specific needs of individual customers. We are already seeing startups, such as ScoutMob and Womply, allow local merchants to combine information on purchases with social media data to provide a more complete picture of customer preferences. (via Big Idea 2013: Big Data for the Little Guy (via LinkedIn) - Futurist Gerd Leonhard)

Data-Driven Main Street: Data will take personal service to new heights, giving small merchants the ability to provide goods and services tailored to the specific needs of individual customers. We are already seeing startups, such as ScoutMob and Womply, allow local merchants to combine information on purchases with social media data to provide a more complete picture of customer preferences. (via Big Idea 2013: Big Data for the Little Guy (via LinkedIn) - Futurist Gerd Leonhard)