Posts tagged Gerd Leonhard

Zukunftsberater und Futurist Gerd Leonhard bei Aeschbacher auf SF1 / SRF 9.10.2014 – YouTube

Zukunftsberater und Futurist Gerd Leonhard bei Aeschbacher auf SF1 / SRF 9.10.2014 – YouTube.  Vielen Dank an SRF für die Einladung und an Kurt Aeschbacher für das nette Gespräch! Die gesamte Show kann von diesem Abend man hier sehen.



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More robots set to take our jobs (Gerd Leonhard quotes via AFR Australia)

Read: More robots set to take our jobs

Swiss-based futurist Gerd Leonhard described the widespread changes over the next few decades as “hellven” in a series of speeches in Australia for CA Technologies in August. He told the Financial Review society would get the benefit of cheaper goods and services thanks to technology, but also faced widespread structural unemployment…Leonhard was less bullish about the future, but agreed people would increasingly create their own jobs that relied on imagination or the personal touch. ”It should be about focusing on what we as humans can do, rather than trying to beat the machine,” he said.

Related images from my library

fey osborne robits ai jobs BpzNbMECYAAq-JKchartoftheday_2566_Technological_Advances_Place_Old_Jobs_At_Risk_nautomated jobs marketingBoG Gerd Leonhard future of jobs work human onlychart-of-the-day-robots-taking-jobsjobs come go automation the atlanticsparks jobs not invented yet education8exponentialtrendsemachine robit versus human jobs



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Leadership Summit for the Future at ITU TeleWorld Doha December 7, 2014 (curated by Gerd Leonhard): complete program announced today

ITU leadership summit for the future gerd leonhard curatorThe ‘Leadership Summit for the Future’ event at this year’s ITU is going to be fantastic, and it is a great pleasure to serve as curator and moderator.  Please note that this an internal ITU / invitation-only event; please contact the ITU staff directly if you are interested in more information. Download the PDF: Leadership Summit for the Future at ITU TeleWorld Doha Dec 7

©ITU/A.AbouharbOpening Keynote: Towards 2020: Future Scenarios and Wild-Cards, and their Impact on Telecommunications, ICT and our Cultures and Societies

In his introduction to the future summit, Gerd will present the most important developments that are likely to impact that next 5-7 years in telecom and ICT, including the Internet of Things/Internet of Everything, Big Data and the advent of business ‘super-intelligence’, artificial intelligence and its pros and cons, digital money and the future of currencies, drastically-increasing digitisation and automation and its impact on the future of work, jobs and education, 3D printing and the maker movement, the rise of the sharing economy, and more. Gerd will depict some likely immediate future scenarios, and deliver some select ‘wild cards’ to get the audience ready for the rest of the event.

Speaker

Mr Gerd Leonhard, Futurist and CEO, The Futures Agency, Curator and Moderator of the Leadership Summit


Keynote Speech and Live Demonstration of Roboy

Living with Robots – The Next Generation of Intelligent Machinesrolf_pfeifer_und_sein_roboter_span12

Robots have changed our world in fundamental ways: without them, we wouldn’t have all the things we love such as cars, airplanes, television, computers and mobile phones. While initially they were confined to factory floors, they have more recently begun to move into our own living space, a space that humans and robots will be sharing, which implies that the design requirements are completely different: robots need to be able to communicate smoothly, quickly, and safely with humans. Roboy will be introduced as a messenger of this new breed of robots. Its – or his? – movement capabilities and its capacity for emotional expression will be briefly demonstrated. Roboy provides the inspiration for a “robot lounge”, in which robots, rather than humans, will take care of the well-being of customers, giving them a glimpse of tomorrow, a feel of what it will be like to closely and continuously interact with robots in a real-world environment. The robot lounge will be launched in 2015/16 in an Asian metropolis.

Speaker

Prof Rolf Pfeifer, Director, Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Department of Informatics, University of Zurich (UZH), Switzerland


Keynote Speech:  The Singularity, Exponential Organizations and the Future of Technologyexponential orgs book 71mRfZDlzaL._SL1434_

Based on analysis of the 100 fastest-growing startups and corporates in the world since 2008, we have detected a new kind of organization with completely new attributes. These are exponential organizations, scalable, flexible, responsive and collaborative.

Speaker

Mr Yuri van Geest, Managing Director of the Singularity University Summit Europe (SUSE), Singularity University, Netherlands


Panel discussion: How Intelligent Software, Artificial Intelligence and Smart Machines will Impact Humanity: Challenges and Opportunities

Technology has now reached a pivot point where exponential leaps in machine intelligence, interfaces and design are certain. The combination of big data, social media, mobile broadband and cheap mobile devices as well as rapid advances in machine learning, semantic understanding, artificial intelligence and robotics will change our society, culture and economics forever. Technological unemployment seems like a certainty, privacy-as-we-know-it may be of thing of the past, robots will become the new normal, and smart – even self-learning – technology is already appearing in many consumer products from wristwatches to kitchen appliances to sensor networks and medical devices. Where will this development take us by 2020? Will augmented humans become normal? What are the benefits for society and people, and what may some of the unintended consequences be? Will we need regulation to deal with tremendous new possibilities? Who will define what is allowed and what is not? If the so-called singularity is near, and if indeed ‘technology has no ethics’ and ‘software is eating the world’, what will happen to still-linear humans in a rapidly technologized world?

Speakers (among others, tba)

Prof Rolf Pfeifer, Director, Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Department of Informatics, University of Zurich (UZH), Switzerland

Mr Yuri van Geest, Managing Director of the Singularity University Summit Europe (SUSE), Singularity University, Netherlands

Mr Gerd Leonhard, Futurist and CEO, The Futures Agency, Curator and Moderator of the Leadership Summit


Video Session:  Futuristic Products and Services

A look at some of the products, services and applications on the cutting-edge of technology today, but set to shape our experience of tomorrow and the near future with sometimes unpredictable consequences.

Moderator

Mr Gerd Leonhard, Futurist and CEO, The Futures Agency, Curator and Moderator of the Leadership Summit


Keynote Speech: The Key Demographic and Data Trends Impacting the ICT Sector in the Next Decade gapminder_home_bg_3

Speaker

Prof Hans Rosling, Edutainer and Chairman, Gapminder, Sweden


Coffee Break

16:00 – 16:30


Keynote Speech:  The Zero Marginal Cost Society – and What This Means for Telecom and ICT  *presented by CiscoCSA Redneragentur_ Jeremy Rifkin The Zero Marginal Cost Society(1)

The first new economic paradigm to evolve since the onset of capitalism and socialism in the 19th century is now emerging on the world stage – the Collaborative Commons. The trigger for this transformative new economic system is the zero marginal cost phenomenon, which has already wreaked havoc across the information goods sectors as millions of consumers begin to produce and share their own music, video and news at near zero marginal cost, bypassing the capitalist market. The expansion of the Internet of Things will bring this phenomenon to the world of physical goods and services, allowing millions of people to produce and share their own green electricity, 3D printed products and other products and services at near zero marginal cost. We are seeing a shift from exchange value in the capitalist market to shareable value in the Collaborative Commons as a younger generation transitions from ownership to access. We are witnessing a whole new hybrid economy – part capitalist market and part Collaborative Commons – that will transform our economic life in the years ahead.

Speaker

Mr Jeremy Rifkin, Founder and President, The Foundation on Economic Trends, Live from Washington


Keynote Speech: The End of Competitive Advantage – and What This Could Mean for the Telecommunications and ICT Sector McGrath_Rita_speaker_w-BK_517x388

In an economic environment in which competitive advantages are increasingly short-lived and unpredictable changes in technology can upend once-stable systems, leaders need to be challenging taken-for-granted assumptions about what the future will hold. In this provocative talk, Columbia Business School’s Rita Gunther McGrath will describe a new playbook for strategy and how information and communications technologies need to be built to adapt.

Speaker

Prof Rita Gunther McGrath, Professor, Columbia Business School, USA


Keynote Speech: How Governments Can Prepare for a Hyper-Connected Future”

The next two decades will see society, business, government and the lives of individuals being transformed beyond all recognition by a powerful set of interconnected forces and developments, characterised by ultra-fast communication, widespread adoption of robotics and artificial intelligence and the ‘internet of life’ – embedding connected sensors and intelligence in everything from roads to our clothing. At the same time business and industry sectors will reshaRohit-Talwarped through new business models, advanced manufacturing techniques such as 3D and 4D printing, synthetic biology, grown structures and a multi-sensory and highly immersive internet. The number and complexity of resulting issues for policy makers is growing all the time and the pace of change is quickening. What are the critical actions and options for governments to ensure they are preparing society for the impact of developments shaping the next two decades? How can we create the foundations for the sectors of the future, encouraging innovation and facilitating entrepreneurship? How can we equip society for radical advances in human health and life expectancy, rethink the education system to meet the changing learning needs of all age groups, or develop new economic models to accommodate the rise of behaviours such as barter, resource sharing and freecycling?

Speaker

Mr Rohit Talwar, Chief Executive Officer, Fast Future Research United Kingdom


Keynote Speech A New, More Dynamic Role for Telecoms in the Digital Economy

The digital economy is evolving fast across all parts of the world, creating huge efficiency gains but also enormous upheaval and disruption to traditional business. Telecoms operators have a golden opportunity to re-think the scope of their role in this changing world, to leverage their latent assets and capabilities to support new levels of innovation in Digital Healthcare, Education, Commerce, Money, Content and Social Inclusion, increasing their value to citizens, consumers, and hqdefaultbusinesses as a result and creating new growth stories for shareholders and investors.

Speaker

Mr Simon Torrance, CEO, Metaflight


Panel Discussion: Global Digital Transformation – Challenges and Opportunities

We have heard many exciting and some potentially worrisome things today – all of them pointing towards the fact that in the very near future rapid changes in just about every segment of our lives are certain. Therefore, our societies, our businesses and our economic logic must not just change but transform in order to thrive in this future. How should companies and organisations get ready for these developments? What kind of framework will they need? Will we need more regulations to ‘put ethics and humanness back into technology’?

Speakers (Other speakers tba)

Prof Rita Gunther McGrath, Professor, Columbia Business School, USA

Mr Rohit Talwar, Chief Executive Officer, Fast Future Research United Kingdom

Mr Simon Torrance, CEO, Metaflight

Mr Michel Combes, CEO, Alcatel-Lucent

Mr Jeremy Rifkin, Founder and President, The Foundation on Economic Trends, Live from Washington


Wrap Up and Closing Session

What We Heard Today, What To Take Away, How To Start Wire-Framing The Future

Speakers

Mr Gerd Leonhard, Futurist and CEO, The Futures Agency, Curator and Moderator of the Leadership Summit

Mr Simon Torrance, CEO, Metaflight



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President Bill Clinton and Peter Diamandis at CGI 2014 – YouTube

via President Bill Clinton and Peter Diamandis at CGI 2014 – YouTube.

Interesting interview with Peter Diamandis, on abundance and the xprize.  A lot of good stuff in here, and I love his enthusiasm but some of his comments strike me as being quite tech-centric. Can every single problem be solved with software, technology or business entrepreneurship (see Peter’s manifest0 below). Should we really push our way forward into AI as her proposes?



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Harry Potter Is Fiction, but Invisibility Cloak(ing Device)s Are Real | Re/code

Harry Potter Is Fiction, but Invisibility Cloak(ing Device)s Are Real | Re/code.

This seems to be a common occurrence these days: what use to be science fiction is becoming very real.  I will (re)-launch a new twitter hashtag on this #nolongerSF :)



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A bunch of short videos on Digital Transformation (short excerpts from my talk at CA Expo in Sydney)

We just did a few very short ‘best of’ – edits of my talk at CA Expo in Sydney,  2 weeks ago. Here they are – below. Enjoy and spread the word!



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Meet me at TedX in Brussels December 1, 2014

This will be fun:).  Thanks for the nice illustration @tedxbrussels :))

gerd Tedx brussels



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Good example of how NOT to do things: Bloomberg’s wifi sponsoring at London City Airport (LCY)

It never fails to amaze me how many companies miss a really potent chance for meaningful interaction and engagement after they spend a ton of money to reach people.  A case in point is what Bloomberg is doing at London City Airport (LCY) which I often fly to when I go to London i.e. every couple of weeks. While they have done a pretty good job with the screens and lounges, after security (albeit in a bit Times-Square style which seems over-the-top at times… ‘you are now entering the world of the might Bloomberg’), their wifi sign-up page (see below) is a very poor attempt at data-capturing that leaves a lot to be desired. Even though not all the fields are mandatory this huge drop-down menu Speicherkarte – Festplatte – Gedächtnis Updateis probably enough to make 95% of people think of Bloomberg as a pain in the butt rather than a friendly entity that is bringing free wifi to you. Remember that old adage ‘if you don’t pay you are the content’ ? Here is yet another instance of that.

Bloomberg dishes up yet another faustian bargain here: I get ‘free’ wifi in return for their spam and divulging my data to them. Yes, I can opt out but they will still have my email and – in the age of powerful data-sucking entities like Axciom – is almost 100% certain they will use / sell /share this information, eventually.  But the worst thing is what they are missing here:

@bloomberg:  how about this:

1) “Bloomberg is delighted to bring you free wifi at LCY. We’d like to make a connection to you, in return, if that’s ok with you…?”

2) Here are some options  a) follow us on twitter  b) like us on Facebook c) watch these latest videos on …. (offer some choices)  d) download these free resources (ebooks, reports etc) e) sign up for a our monthly newsletter   f) download this cool app … etc etc

I think this would go a long way in making Bloomberg seem like they actually want to make a connection rather than fill up their database so that they can eventually interrupt me with some meaningless stuff that is completely impersonal and unrelated.

Machine-thinking still prevails in marketing, I guess.

Any thoughts?

bloomberg wifi page london



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New speaking topic: digital transformation in telecommunications and ICT

As some of you may know, I have always done quite a bit of work in telecom, mobile and ICT but am now getting a lot more requests for speeches, seminars and advisory sessions on this topic. I reckon this is partly because of some recent developments such as Facebook/WhatsApp, Apple’s iPay, Alibaba’s IPO etc, all of which might be pointers towards a future that will be very different than the present or the past.  Therefore, here is a new topic I am offering to those that are interested.

Digital transformation in telecommunications, mobile and ICT: challenges and opportunities in a new ecosystem

In the next decade, we are facing a magnitude of new opportunities as well as some seriously ‘wicked challenges’ driven by exponential technological progress, and the cultural changes this is causing.

Most importantly, the telecommunications, content / entertainment / publishing, e-commerce and social media sectors are finally converging as mobile devices (incl. tablets, wearables and quite possibly imageimplants) are becoming the preferred tools of connectivity and interaction for GenY and Z. All digital content – music, books, movies, banking/money, education, health / medical and all kinds of information – is rapidly moving into the cloud, making very reliable, high-speed yet low cost connectivity a must-have at all times, anywhere.  Yet, the business of merely connecting to the cloud is not likely to remain a stand-alone industry in the very near future because converged, digitally-native business models are proving to be increasingly disruptive (maybe a ‘Tesla of mobile services’ is likely to emerge, soon).

Increasingly, cloud / data security and surveillance vs privacy – issues are quickly becoming a major concern for consumers as well as for the platforms and connectivity providers. Meanwhile, the Internet of Things / Internet of Everything is gearing up to be 10-50x the size of the traditional ‘Internet of People & Computers’, promising huge cost savings and much increased efficiency in energy, transportation and logistics, infrastructure and marketing / advertising, and creating entirely new opportunities for the entire ICT sector, and beyond. The buzzword of 2014  clearly was ‘Big Data‘ which – in tandem with the exponentially evolving machine/artificial intelligence – is quickly becoming the new global currency. Data is now truly becoming the new oil – by 2020, big data is expected to generate over $ 7 Trillion USD in new revenue streams, according to MGI. Add other significant global trends such as the rise of the sharing economy, the fast adoption of new interfaces such as voice control, AR and VR plus the dawn of mass-market 3D-printing (the ‘napsterization of objects’) to the mix, and the magnitude of this transformation becomes obvious.

By 2020, many of these trends will have converged and created an entirely new ‘telemedia’ ecosystem that will be deeply converged and interdependent, circular and much more sustainable in every way.

This development will no longer tolerate the traditional silos of telecommunications i.e. ‘infrastructure’ versus content, media or services, forcing telecoms and mobile operators to think of themselves as platforms and brands rather than as walled gardens, channels or infrastructure providers. The total abundance of connectivity, devices and content will create an entirely new breed of user/consumer that will constantly look for added values and what Kevin Kelly called ’New Generatives’, monitoring the strength of a brand and its overall purpose and relevance. Business as usual is dying. Telcos, ISPs and mobile operators (and those that cater to them), need to understand and reflect on those key trends, and discover ways to fundamentally transform their business models in order to remain relevant (better yet, indispensable) in 5-7 years.  In a world of 5-6 Billion hyper-connected users (i.e. by 2020) the mere provision and selling of that connectivity will no doubt become a commodity – still a valuable one, yes,  but  (a lot like music, films or news / publishing) – no longer the single most important driver of growth and market value. Digital business model transformation is the name of the game, now.

As usual, here are some related images:



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